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Prof. Amanda Weidman (Anthropology, Bryn Mawr): Trading Voices: The Gendered Beginnings of Playback in South India (Mon 12/5, 4P

Event Start: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by:

Prof. Amanda Weidman (Anthropology, Bryn Mawr College)

Trading Voices: The Gendered Beginnings of Playback in South India

Monday Dec. 5, 2016
4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public
Reception to Follow

Description: This talk examines the period of transition from singing actors and actresses to the playback system in the South Indian Tamil language film industry, focusing on its gendered beginnings as a form of experimentation with female voices and bodies in the 1940s.  I examine the discourse around actresses that viewed them as fragmentable entities, discussed in terms of natippu (acting), pattu (singing), nattiyam (dancing), and azhaku (looks, beauty); debates about the practice of iraval kural, the “traded” voice; and the ways that female voice-body relationships were constructed and managed in films of the late 1940s and early 50s, in which a system of differentiated female voices accomplished crucial ideological work.  

More broadly, I argue that playback lent itself to the typification of characters, since the character traits of the onscreen body, rather than being voiced by the actress with whatever kind of voice she might have, could be accentuated by the use of a “suitable” playback voice. With its constructed pairing of voices and bodies, playback theoretically made gender crossings and “cross-dressed” voices possible, but in this context it in fact led to a greater regimentation of voice-body relationships and gendered vocal sound—a regimentation that would be realized concretely in the vocal domination of a very few playback singers later in the 1950s. 

Amanda Weidman is a cultural anthropologist with interests in music, language, performance, technological mediation, and semiotics.  She has conducted research in South India for more than 20 years, and is currently at work on a book project on the aesthetics and ideologies that govern playback singing in the South Indian Tamil film industry.  She is a member of the Anthropology Department at Bryn Mawr College, where she teaches courses in Linguistic Anthropology, Anthropology of Sound and Media, History of Anthropological Theory, and contemporary South Asia. She is also a Karnatic violinist.  She holds the PhD in Anthropology from Columbia University, and is the author of Singing the Modern, Voicing the Classical (Duke U. P. 2006).

Sounding China in the World: A Workshop (Friday, Dec. 3, 9AM-5:30PM)

Event Start: 
Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 9:30am
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

SOUNDING CHINA IN THE WORLD: A WORKSHOP

Friday, December 2, 2016
701C Dodge Hall, 2960 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 

Joseph-Marie Amiot, Mémoire sur la musique des Chinois , tant anciens que modernes

Sounding China in the World: A Workshop on Musical Circulations to and from China from the Qing Dynasty Through the Present

9:30am-5:30 pm, 701c Dodge Hall

In this workshop, we will investigate the evolving place of China in the world and of the world in China through the important and underutilized lens of music. Examining circulations of music and their connections to processes of knowledge formation, we will consider the ways diverse musics have been transmitted, reformulated, and integrated in contexts ranging from the eighteenth century Qing court to contemporary southern China. We aim to generate productive dialogue through transhistorical perspectives across and through disciplines in order to reassess China’s central role in the formation of a globalized culture from the Enlightenment through the present.

Schedule

9:30 Welcome (Susan Boynton)

10:00 Session 1 (Chair: Susan Boynton)

10:00-11:00: Qingfan Jiang (Music, Columbia), Unfinished Mission: Jesuits and the Circulation of Musical Knowledge in the Encyclopedic Century (respondent: Paize Keulemans) 

11:00-12:00: Paize Keulemans (East Asian Studies, Princeton), An Aural Account of the Fall of the Ming Dynasty: Critical Listening in Chinese Rumor, Jesuit History, and Dutch Tragedy of the 17th Century

(respondent: Qingfan Jiang)

2:00-3:00: Session 2 (Chair: Wei Shang, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia)

2:00-3:00: Adam Kielman (Music, Columbia), Mobilities, Musical Cosmopolitanism, and Southern China’s Transforming Music Industry (respondent: Fred Lau)

3:00-4:00: Fred Lau (Music, University of Hawaii), “Are we there yet?” 1960s Hong Kong Pop Music and Modernity (respondent: Adam Kielman)

4:00-4:30 Break 

4:30-5:30 Final Discussion 

Sponsors: Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Department of Music, Columbia Global Centers | Beijing

Nicola Scaldaferri (Univ. of Milano): The Ethnomusicologist & his Zampogna (Thurs. Dec 1, 4PM)

Event Start: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents a Talk By:

Prof. Nicola Scaldaferri
(University of Milano, Italy)

The Ethnomusicologist and his Zampogna. Collaborative Research in Basilicata (Southern Italy)

Thursday Dec. 1, 2016
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public 
Reception to Follow

The presentation discusses the author's experience in the field as a bagpipes player (the instrument is the Italian zampogna, a double chanter instrumentin his home region, in Basilicata, in Southern Italyespecially during festivals and religious rituals; and more recently, also in other contexts, as a way of building a common ground with local musiciansA particular focus will be on the festival Maggio di Accettura, the object of a collaborative research done in team, with Steven Feld and photographs Stefano Vaja and Lorenzo Ferrarini. It will be introduced by a description of the instruments and musical repertory.

Nicola Scaldaferri is associate professor at the University of Milan, where is the director of the LEAV (Laboratory of Ethnomusicology and Visual Anthropology). He received his PhD in Musicology at the University of Bologna, the degree in Composition at the Conservatory of Parma; he was Fulbright scholar at Harvard University, and visiting professor at St. Peterburg State University. His interests include 20th century music and technology, Balkan epics, Italian folk music, instruments from Western AfricaAs performer he plays zampogne and other Italian folk instruments.

An Evening of Cross-Cultural Improvisation (Steve Loza, Farzad Amoozegar, Qi Li, Manoochehr Sadhegi) Wed 11/16 7PM

Event Start: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 7:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents:

An Intimate Evening of Cross-Cultural Improvisation featuring Steve Loza, Qi Li, Farzad Amoozegar, and Manoochehr Sadhegi.

Wednesday Nov. 16, 2016
7PM-9PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Free and Open to the Public, Reception to Follow

_________________________________________

Qi Li is a highly accomplished performing artist on the erhu, the Chinese two-string bowed fiddle, and a prolific educator of Chinese music.  After graduating from the China Conservatory of Music in 1982, she performed for several years as erhu soloist with the Beijing-based National Traditional Orchestra of China (the most renowned orchestra of Chinese instruments).  She has been featured in concerts at prestigious venues such as Madison Squire Garden (New York), Ronald Reagan Building (Washington. D.C.), and Avery Fisher Hall/Lincoln Center (New York). She also directs several Chinese music groups in California, including the Los Angeles Chinese Music Ensemble.

Farzad Amoozegar is a specialist in the Persian plucked lutes tar and setar. As a teenager, having migrated from Iran to Canada, he began learning the classical radif tradition at the age of eleven from Master Mohammed Reza Lotfi in US, and then moved to Iran during his early twenty to study under master musicians such as Hossein Alizadehi, Dariush Tala'i, Hooshang Zarif, Masood Shareai, and Ershad Tahmasbie. While in Tehran, he has also lectured on Iranian music at Azad University, led various workshops on tar and setar, and performed throughout Iran and the Middle East. Currently, he is a doctoral candidate in the departments of ethnomusicology and anthropology at UCLA.

Steven Loza has taught at UCLA since 1984 and currently serves as chair of the Department of Ethnomusicology. His areas of research include topics such as religion as art and musical mesitzaje, the mixing of race and culture.  He is the author of Barrio Rhythm: Mexican American Music in Los Angeles and Tito Puente and the Making of Latin Music. among numerous other publications. He has directed ensembles focusing on Latin American music, world jazz, and intercultural improvisation.  He has recorded three CDs of his music; a recent composition was premiered by the Mexico City Philharmonic Orchestra.


Manoochehr Sadhegi was born in Tehran, Iran, and came to the U.S. to study music, completing his MA in ethnomusicology under Mantle Hood at UCLA. He is considered a Grandmaster or Ostad of the saunter, a Persian hammered dulcimer. He was awarded the 2003 National Heritage Fellowship Award by the Library of Congress and in 2002 he was a recipient of the Durfee Foundation Master Musician Award. Through the past fifty years he has performed concerts of classical Persian music on the santur  lectured at various schools and universities, taught performance privately and with group projects (including a performance ensemble at UCLA), recorded various CD projects, and performed Persian classical music on the santur.

Prof. John Troutman: "Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars" - Friday Nov. 4, 2016, 4PM

Event Start: 
Friday, November 4, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology is please to present a colloquium presentation by:

Prof. John W. Troutman

(History and Geography, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, author of Indian Blues and the new Kika Kila)

speaking on:
"Steel Bars and Hawaiian Guitars: (Re)Centering Indigenous Technology and Musical Practice within the Origins of the Modern Music Industry."

Friday November 4, 2016
4:00PM to 6:00PM 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Reception to follow talk
Information: aaf19@columbia.edu

Free and open to the public!

The Hawaiian steel guitar profoundly altered the early twentieth-century sounds of the modern music industry. However, few scholars have acknowledged the instrument's role in shaping the soundtrack of modernity, let alone its indigenous origins.  In this talk, John Troutman will draw from his new book, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music, in order to contemplate the efforts of Hawaiians to develop a new instrument within the context of intense colonial upheaval, and their impact along regional theater circuits and on New York City stages in the years that followed.

Interested members of the public are also invited to attend Prof. Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016, from 6-7:30pm, to hear Prof. Troutman discuss his important first book, Indian Blues. Please defer to students in the class during discussion if you attend. 


John Troutman is Associate Professor of History at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He received his doctorate in history from the University of Texas at Austin and his master’s degree in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona. He has received multiple fellowships and grants from the Smithsonian Institution, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. His research agenda focuses on the historical significance of music in American life, particularly in the lives of indigenous peoples. His first book, Indian Blues: American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934, was favorably reviewed in journals that span the disciplines of American Studies, History, Musicology, Anthropology, Folklore, and American Indian Studies; among other accolades it won the Western History Association’s biennial W. Turrentine Jackson Award for a "first book on any aspect of the American West.” In May of this year, the University of North Carolina Press published his second monograph, Kīkā Kila: How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music. The book chronicles the history of the Hawaiian steel guitar, from the cultural and political context that produced it in the Islands in the 1880s, to its role in shaping the sounds of modern music in North America and throughout the world.

______________________

Prof. Zuzana Jurkova -- "Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group: the Case of the Czech Roma" (10/27 4PM)

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Dr. Zuzana Jurková 
(Head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology, Faculty of Humanities, Charles University, Charles University, Prague)

Music Representation of an Underprivileged Group:
the Case of the Czech Roma

Thursday,  October 27, 2016
4:00pm – 6:00pm
701c Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus
Free and Open to the Public, Reception to Follow Talk

Abstract: Although the Roma are the most numerous minority in the Czech Republic (ca. 3% of the population) they did not established any mechanism for the selection of political or cultural representatives. In fact, the Roma who reach influential positions negotiate and construct their roles in accordance to who they were elected to represent and those they face. Because of this situation, there is no coherent way of Roma representation through music despite the fact that such a representation is regarded by the public opinion as the most positive aspect of Romani culture which can be used as a marker of collective identity and, at the same time, as a powerful “diplomatic” tool (Lundberg 2010). This talk focuses on two different aspects of Romani musical representations in the Czech Republic: individual and institutional. In the first case, I analyze how two of the most distinguished and visible “Romani” musicians construct their musical styles and, in turn, how various groups consider these styles as Romani. In the second case, the talk focuses on Džemil and Jelena Silajdžič, the managers of the biggest European Romani festival held annually in Prague (Khamoro). I discuss the profound influence that these two managers have on the (re)presentation of Romani music in the Czech Republic, and analyze the role of the Silajdžičs as mediators of the perception of Romani music(s) among the majority, among Roma themselves.  

Zuzana Jurková studied ethnology and musicology at the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University and at the music conservatory in Brno. She is the head of the Institute for Ethnomusicology at the Faculty of Humanities of Charles University, focused mainly on the the research of musics of minorities (Voices of the Weak, 2009; Sounds from the Margins, 2013). She concentrates on Romani music (including numerous publications, and an Open Society Fund grant in 1996-8), on the history of Czech ethnomusicology (Ph.D. 1996, a Fulbright scholarship in Bloomington, USA, 1998) and, in recent years, on urban ethnomusicology (Pražské hudební světy 2013; Prague Soundscapes 2014)

A conversation with Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II (CSER) -- Wed Oct 26, 12 Noon (and Standing Rock Teach-In

Event Start: 
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 - 12:00pm
Location: 
IAB International Affairs Bldg Room 1512 (420 W 118th St.) Columbia University

The Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University presents Indigenous Forum:


























A conversation with Standing Rock Sioux Chairman David Archambault II at Columbia University 

Wednesday, October 26, 12:00pm 
IAB International Affairs Bldg 
Room 1512
420 W 118th St. 











Standing Rock Teach-In! Friday Oct 28, Schermerhorn Hall 612, 6:30-9:30PM 
https://www.facebook.com/events/341027599576973/



Sacramento Knoxx at the Center October 20 & 21 (Detroit rapper and activist)

Event Start: 
Friday, October 21, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to announce two events featuring Detroit-based rapper, producer, filmmaker, and social activist Sacramento Knoxx.  

Performance/Hangout/Discussion (open to public)
Friday October 21
4-6PM
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus)
Refreshments to be served, open to the public 

Also: Class Session for "Music in Contemporary Native America" (open to public with limited seating)
Thursday October 20
6:00-7:30PM
701C Dodge Hall
Visitors welcome, please defer to students registered in class during discussions

About Knoxx

Sacramento Knoxx is a Detroit-based Anishinaabe/Chicanx rapper, producer, media artist, poet, and social activist. His work has been widely recognized in the press and online for its innovative blending of Indigenous and intersectional critiques and themes.  He was recently recognized with the 2015 Gilda Award from the Kresge Foundation.  

Learn more about Knoxx!

Sacramento Knoxx's website
Sacramento Knoxx YouTube Channel
Sacramento Knoxx on Bandcamp
Sacramento Knoxx on Facebook
Video of "Minobidmaadziwin" (collaboration with A Tribe Called Red)
Michigan Public Radio "How hip-hop helped this Ojibwe/Chicano Detroiter define himself."
Michigan Public Radio: "Detroit hip-hop musician combines art and activism."

"The aadizookaan" is an Anishinaabe word that translates into the sacred spirit of the story, the messages we share and pass on in our visits. Knoxx uses multimedia art to build interconnections between many diverse audiences, artists, media makers, organizers, educators, cultural workers, students & the many layers of communities around the world. He explores ancestral & traditional knowledge systems using contemporary tools of hiphop culture & poetry, performance, video projections, dance, film & live music production for an innovative installation of beauty & creative storytelling to educate, inspire, & motivate.  As he says, "I organize sound through motion and rhythm. My true divinity is within my ability to create. I make music. I'm a part of a movement for social change. The real revolution is the revolution of consciousness. Think and smile."

Sacramento Knoxx Photograph © Julian “DJ HE TOOK” Jacobs


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Dr. Robin Gray (UC Santa Cruz) -- "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control" (Friday Sept. 30

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusioclogy)
The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to welcome:
Dr. Robin R. R. Gray (Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in History, University of California, Santa Cruz)

speaking on:  "Repatriation and Decolonization: Thoughts on Ownership, Access, and Control."

Friday, Sept. 30, 2016
4PM-6PM (reception to follow)
701C Dodge Hall
Free and Open to the Public

_____________
Members of the public are also invited to join Dr. Gray for a session of Prof. Aaron Fox's class "Music in Contemporary Native America" on:

Thursday, Sept. 29, 6PM-7:30PM, 701C Dodge Hall


This presentation is based on an assigned reading from Dr. Gray's PhD dissertation: "Ts'msyen Revolution" Chaps 1-4.

Bio: Dr. Robin Gray (Ts’msyen) holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology (2015), and a Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Studies (2015) from the University of Massachusetts.  She is currently a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her work engages in multi-sited, community-based research projects involving the international repatriation of Ts’msyen songs from archives, and embodied heritage reclamation in an urban Ts’msyen dance group. She is also developing a comprehensive knowledge dissemination strategy based on the topic, Researching, Representing and Repatriating Ts’msyen Cultural Heritage.  

Dr. Gray's website can be viewed at:   
http://www.robingray.ca

For more information contact Aaron Fox at aaf19@columbia.edu

Prof. Alessandra Ciucci: "Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean" (University Seminar in Arabic Studi

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 6, 2016 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: 
Faculty House, Columbia University
University Seminars at Columbia University
SEMINAR IN ARABIC STUDIES presents

"Performing Rurality: Music and Migration across the Mediterranean (Morocco-Italy)"

Speaker: Alessandra Ciucci
Columbia University, Department of Music

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Faculty House, 7-8 pm


Alessandra Ciucci is currently Assistant Professor of Music (Ethnomusicology) at Columbia University. She received her PhD in music (ethnomusicology) from The City University of New York at The Graduate Center. Her research interests include: the music of Morocco, North Africa, the Mediterranean, music and gender, sung poetry, and music and migration. Her articles appear in Ethnomusicology, The Yearbook for Traditional Music, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, Mondi Migranti, Cahiers de musiques traditionnelles, in the Sage Encyclopaedia of Ethnomusicology, and in several edited volumes. Ciucci has been a recipient of a Fulbright foreign scholarship grant (Morocco), a fellowship from the Jewish Foundation for the Education of Women, a grant from the American Institute for Maghrib Studies Grant, and a Junior faculty summer research grant for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Dr. Ciucci was a Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Music Department at Columbia 2008-10.

Professor Ciucci will discuss the sound of a specific notion of the rural (l-‘ǝrubiya) which, through contemporary migration, travels from central Morocco across the Mediterranean to Italy. She ethnographically explores how the sound of such a notion of the rural—as a site of aesthetic behaviors, performative acts, and signifying practices—resonates across borders through ‘abidat rma—a musico-poetic genre performed at private and public celebrations and circulated through cassettes, CDs, DVDs, MP3s, and the Internet in Morocco and abroad. She argues that ‘abidat rma challenges a sonic construction of the Mediterranean which has privileged a Eurocentric mode of listening, rather than that experienced by moving and migrating bodies. To this end, Ciucci explores how Moroccan men from the central regions of Morocco, engaged in the experience and in the imagination of migration across the Mediterranean to Italy, disrupt a seamless narrative of the Mediterranean through the performance of a specific and intimate sense of the rural in sound. She examines how the poetic language, gesture, and sound of ‘abidat rma are imbued with locality, how this sung poetry gives voice to conflicts of transformation, and how it articulates the affective and sonic lives of generations of male Moroccan migrants at a transnational level.

The talk will begin at 7:00 pm. For more information or to register for the pre-talk dinner, write the seminar's rapporteur Sahar Ishtiaque Ullah (su2156@columbia.edu) no later than Thursday, September 29, 2016.  

For a listing of Seminars in Arabic Studies, visit http://universityseminars.columbia.edu/seminars/arabic-studies/
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