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Dr. Jessica Schwartz Appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at UCLA!

Dr. Jessica Schwartz

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Jessica Schwartz, currently completing her two year term as a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at The University of California, Los Angeles!

Dr. Schwartz holds the PhD in Ethnomusicology from New York University, where she completed a dissertation entitled:  "Resonances of the Atomic Age: Hearing the Nuclear Legacy in the United States and the Marshall Islands, 1945-2010," advised by Prof. Jairo Moreno.  She has published articles in, among other places,  Transactions of the Royal Historical Society,Women and Music, and Music&Politics.  Dr. Schwartz is also the founder of  the Marshallese Educational Initiative, Inc., a not-for-profit organization dedicated to expanding educational opportunities for Marshallese and raising awareness of Marshallese issues.

Dr. Toby King Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at UNC/Asheville!

Jonathan "Toby" King

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates
Dr. Jonathan "Toby" King (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2014), who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at The University of North Carolina at Asheville!  Dr. King's dissertation is entitled "Implications of Contemporary Bluegrass Music Performance at and around a New York City Jam Session," and it is sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox. Dr. King defended his dissertation on June 2, 2014.  We congratulate him for that as well!

Maria Sonevytsky Appointed Assistant Professor at Bard College!

The Department of Music congratulates alumna Dr. Maria Sonevysky (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2012).  Dr. Sonevytsky has been appointed as Assistant Professor of Music at Bard College, beginning in 2014.  Prior to taking up the position at Bard, Dr. Sonevysky will be a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto for 2013-14. read more »

Tyler Bickford Appointed Assistant Professor of English at The University of Pittsburgh



The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates ethnomusicology graduate program alumnus Tyler Bickford (PhD, 2011, With Distinction), who has been appointed as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of English (in Children's Literature and Childhood Studies) at the University of Pittsburgh. 
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Dr. Lauren Ninoshvili Appointed ACLS New Faculty Fellow at NYU

Dr. Lauren NinoshviliCongratulations to Dr. Lauren Ninoshvili (PhD, 2010, Ethnomusicology), who has accepted a two year appointment as an American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellow in the Department of Music at New York University!

Currently, Dr. Ninoshvili is an adjunct professor of music at Barnard College (2010-12), teaching courses on music history and offering a thesis seminar for Barnard Special Majors in Ethnomusicology. 

Dr. Ninoshvili's doctoral dissertation is entitled "Singing Between the Words: The Poetics of Georgian Polyphony."   It was sponsored by Prof. Fox.  The abstract appears below.

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ABSTRACT
Singing Between the Words: The Poetics of Georgian Polyphony

There is a strange paradox in Georgia‘s relation to the West which has emerged in ever sharper detail with the passage of time since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Geographically and culturally, Georgia is borderline but not quite fully exotic, oriental: located at the gates of Asia and the Muslim Middle East, it is one of the oldest Christian countries and a rare Caucasian nation oriented primarily towards the European sphere of influence for the last two centuries.

It is precisely this slippery boundary between comfortable familiarity and exotic impenetrability that language in Georgian song—my chief object of inquiry in this dissertation—embodies. The search for meaning in the obscure, archaic, or conventionally unintelligible often emerges concomitantly with narratives of cultural loss at moments of radical social, political, and economic upheaval or transformation, and the Georgian case is no exception. The present dissertation therefore posits the paired expressive-communicative modes of language and music as a lens for inquiry into (un)intelligibility as a salient aesthetic and political trope in the turmoil and ideological anomie of postsocialist Georgia, approaching it through a specifically music-centered ethnography of non-referential sung language, or vocables, in traditional and newer, globally oriented Georgian song. It explores variable and shifting tropes of interpretive ambiguity as produced by artist-performers and intellectuals, poets and politicians in the
name of everything from trans-rational linguistic futurism to the building of civic consciousness based on a primordial, archaeological imagination of the nation, to the need to make the Georgian language-music gestalt globally accessible so that world music listeners will buy it. My specific discussion of contemporary Georgian world music poses broader questions for the discipline of ethnomusicology as a whole: How can the study of language in world music serve as a forum for the exploration of non- referential forms of intercultural communication and meaning-making? How can studies of sound and listening as such be rejoined to studies of properly musical creativity and expression, beginning from the voice itself?

Farzaneh Hemmasi Appointed as Assistant Professor at U Toronto

Farzi HemmasiThe Center for Ethnomusicology and the PhD Prorgram in Ethnomusicology at Columbia warmly congratulate Dr. Farzaneh Hemmasi (PhD, 2010, Ethnomusicology), who has accepted an appointment as Assistant Professor of Music (tenure track) at The University of Toronto. Dr. Hemmasi is currently an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Penn Humanities Forum at the University of Pennsylvania. 




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Dr. Hemmasi's dissertation was advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa, and is entitled "Iranian Popular Music in Los Angeles: Mobilizing Media, Nation and Politics."  The dissertation is an ethnographic and historical study of the Iranian exile music industry that emerged in Southern California after popular music was banned in Iran following the 1978-79 Revolution. Drawing on interviews with musicians and media producers, Dr. Hemmasi's work demonstrates the many transformations Persian-language musiqi-ye pop has undergone since its inception in the 1950s from a symbol of cosmopolitan modernity, to a banned cultural form in the revolution, to a medium for exiles' aesthetic recombination and circulation of Iran.

Gagaku Coordinator Position

Immediate Job Opening
Half Time Program Coordinator Position
Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies, Columbia University

We are seeking a half-time Program Coordinator to work approximately 20 hours per week. Salary is commensurate with experience. The position is open immediately. Training will be provided.  read more »

Congratulations to Morgan Luker, Andy Eisenberg and Brian Karl!

Congratulations to Ethnomusicology PhD student Morgan Luker, who has accepted a position as a lecturer in Ethnomusicology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Morgan will be teaching two undergraduate ethnomusicology courses and the graduate proseminar in ethnomusicology.

Congratulations to Ethnomusicology PhD student Brian Karl who has accepted a position as a lecturer in Anthropology at Colby College.

Congratulations to Ethnomusicology PhD student Andy Eisenberg, who has accepted a position as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at Stony Brook University.  read more »

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