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Workshop with Prof. Georgina Born: "Retheorizing the Social; Rethinking the Genre" (4/1, 4-7pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents a Workshop with:


Prof. Georgina Born (University of Oxford)

"Retheorizing the Social; Rethinking the Genre"

Wednesday, April 1, 2015
4-7pm
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

Free and open to the public.







click for full-sized poster!















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Film Screening: Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975 (4/2 8pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 2, 2015 - 8:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology), Columbia Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology's 2015 Ethnographic Film Series invite you to a screening of:

Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975


Thursday, April 2,  8 PM
701C Dodge Hall.
Refreshments to be served.
Free and open to the public!

About the Film: During the rise of The Black Power Movement in the 60s and 70s, Swedish Television journalists documented the unfolding cultural revolution for their audience back home, having been granted unprecedented access to prominent leaders such as Angela Davis, the SNCC's Stokely Carmichael, and Black Panthers founders Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale.  Now, after more than 30 years in storage, this never-before-seen footage spanning nearly a decade of Black Power is finally available. Director Goran Hugo Olsson presents this mixtape, highlighting the key figures and events in the movement, as seen in a light completely different than the narrative of the American media at the time.  Talib Kweli, Erykah Badu, Abiodun Oyewole, John Forte, and Robin Kelley are among the many important voices providing narration and commentary, adding modern perspective to this essential time capsule of African-American history.





















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Prof. David Novak: "Music, protest,and the politics of festival in Japan's nuclear village" (March 23, Noon)

Event Start: 
Monday, March 23, 2015 - 12:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Graduate Colloquium Series Presents: 

Prof.  David Novak
(University of California at Santa Barbara, & Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD Alumnus)

"Music, protest,and the politics of festival in Japan's nuclear village" 

Monday March 23, 2015
12:00 Noon

701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnousicology)
Free and Open to the Public

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David Novak is Associate Professor of Music and Co-Director of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  He is the author of Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Ciruclation (Duke Univ. Press, 2013).  He holds the PhD in Ethnomusicology from Columbia University.  His work explores cultural and political formations through the ethnography of popular music, and examines how the circulation of global media becomes central to processes of social and epistemological transformation. His interests include globalization of popular music, remediation, protest culture, and social practices of listening. His current project focuses on the politics of sound in urban Japan, particularly in the impact of noise regulations on homeless and migrant labor communities in South Osaka, and on the role of music, sound, and noise in the antinuclear movement in post-3.11 Japan.            

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"Concert Spirituals and the Black Soprano": Recital and Panel Discussion (4/22, 7pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Columbia University St. Paul's Chapel: 1160 Amsterdam Avenue

"CONCERT SPRITUALS AND THE BLACK SOPRANO" (A RECITAL AND PANEL DISCUSSION)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015
(Concert at 7pm; Panel Discussion at 8pm)

Location:  Columbia University St. Paul's Chapel, 1160 Amsterdam Avenue
Free and Open to the Public!

PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

This event is jointly sponsored by:

Music Performance Program
Columbia University Department of Music
Louis Armstrong Jazz Performance Program
Center of Ethnomusicology
Institute of Research in African-American Studies
Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life
Office of the Core Curriculum



TONIGHT! Prof. Elizabeth Povinelli - "The Otherwise in Geontological Power" (March 5, 6pm)

Event Start: 
Thursday, March 5, 2015 - 6:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology
The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a talk by
PROF. ELIZABETH POVINELLI
(Anthropology and Gender Studies, Columbia University)
"The Otherwise in Geontological Power"
Thursday, March 5, 2015
6PM
701C Dodge Hall
(Center for Ethnomusicology)
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Elizabeth Povinelli is Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at COlumbia University.  Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Her first two books examine the governance of the otherwise in late liberal settler colonies from the perspective of the politics of recognition. Her most recent two books examined the same from the perspective of intimacy, embodiment, and narrative form. Prof. Povinelli's ethnographic analysis is animated by a critical engagement with the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory.

Click here for a full-sized poster (PDF)

Trevor Reed and Robin R. R. Gray Discuss Native American/First Nations Music Repatriation Projects (Wed 12/10, 1-3pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus
The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Native American Scholar/Activists Trevor Reed and Robin R. R. Gray Discuss Their Repatriations of Columbia's Laura Boulton Collection to Hopi and Tsimshian Communities

Wednesday,  December 10, 1-3PM 701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)

This colloquium will feature Trevor Reed (Hopi, current Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD and Columbia Law JD student, reporting on his work repatriating Laura Boulton's 1933 and 1940 Hopi music collections, and Robin R. R. Gray, (Tsimshian, Lax'Kwalaams, Ginaxangiik Tribe, and Mikisew Cree First Nation, Anthropology PhD candidate at U Mass/Amherst), who is working to repatriate Boulton's 1933 Tsimshian (Northwest Coast) recordings, made (like the Hopi 1933 recordings) at the Chicago Century of Progress Exposition.

Reed and Gray are working to redevelop these recordings as assets for contemporary communities (and as the long-alienated cultural property of these communities) descended from the performers on the recordings, at the intersection of ethnomusicology, anthropology, cultural rights activism, archiving, and law.  Their work embraces and helps define current critical practice for scholarly and legal activism in accounting for and remediating the exploitation and hoarding of Native American cultural patrimony by collectors, ethnomusicologists, anthropologists, commercial interests, and scholarly and curatorial institutions throughout the 20th century. 

To learn more about Trevor Reed's work, visit the Hopi Music Repatriation Project blog here:
http://hopimusic.wordpress.com/

Listen to Trevor Reed discuss the project with Hopi Cultural Preservation Office (HCPO)repatriation coordinator, Lee Wayne Lomayestewa:
https://hopimusic.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/03-podcast_leewayne-final.mp3

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To learn more about Robin R. R. Gray's work, visit her website here:
http://www.sfu.ca/ipinch/about/ipinch-people/fellows/robin-r-r-gray

Or see a video interview with Robin R. R. Gray  here:
IPinCH Conversations / Robin R.R. Gray on Reconciliation and Repatriation  

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General information on the Center's extensive repatriation efforts can be found here:
http://news.columbia.edu/research/3186

Or on video here: 
http://vimeo.com/68637578


Book Launch for Prof. Ana María Ochoa Gautier's "Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia" (11/25, 7PM)

Event Start: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Book Culture, 536 W 112th St, New York, NY

You are invited to Book Culture Tuesday, November 25th, at 7pm for the launch of Prof. Ana María Ochoa Gautier's new book, Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia, published by Duke University Press.

Event Date: Tuesday, Nov. 25th, 7:00pm
Location:  Book Culture (event link here)
536 W 112th St, New York, NY 10025

In Aurality, Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her "acoustically tuned" analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.

Ana María Ochoa Gautier is Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University. She is the author of several books and many articles.

$24.95
ISBN: 9780822357513
Availability: Coming Soon - Available for Pre-Order Now
Published: Duke University Press - November 21st, 2014

Rolando Peña: How To Be A Latin American Vanguard Artist and Not Die Trying (Nov. 19, 4-6pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 4:37pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology), Columbia U. Morningside Campus, Broadway @ 116th St.

Rolando PeñaThe Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Rolando Peña
"How To Be A Latin American Vanguard Artist and Not Die Trying."

Wed. Nov. 19, 4pm-6pm
Center for Ethnomusicology
701C Dodge Hall
Columbia University Morningside Campus
116th and Broadway

Free and open to the public!


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click image for full-sized poster!

Rolando Peña is an internationally known multimedia artist who has been involved in theatre, dance, and fine arts since 1958. A student of architecture and design at Universidad Central de Venezuela, he joined the theater faculty of that university in 1963. In 1965 he staged the pioneering multimedia shows Testimonio and Homenaje a Henry Miller with the writer José Ignacio Cabrujas, which featured dance, theater, films, slide projections, and other elements, the first such performances in Caracas.

Supported by a grant from the Venezuelan government, he then moved to New York City to study dance with Martha Graham, Alwin Nicolais, and Merce Cunningham. He was quickly accepted by some of the iconic figures of the day. In 1966 Allen Ginsburg and Timothy Leary joined him for the psychedelic show The Illumination of the Buddha, and the following year he founded and directed the Latin American vanguard group The Foundation for the Totality, which presented exhibitions, happenings, films, publications, and other projects. Soon he became involved with Andy Warhol and his famous Factory: Warhol filmed many of The Foundation for the Totality’s happenings, and Mr. Pena acted in some of Warhol’s films.

Rolando Peña’s own film Diálogo con Ché, which he scripted and acted in and José Soltero directed and shot in New York, was invited to the 1969 Cannes Film Festival, the Berlin Film Festival, and the Cinémathèque Palais Chaillot in Paris. Moving back to multimedia, in 1975 he exhibited Santería at the Bogarin Workshop Gallery in New York, and this same multimedia installation was the opening exhibit at the Annex at the Contemporary Art Museum in Caracas.

But beginning in 1980 he found the theme that became the predominant focus of his subsequent work: crude oil. Mr. Peña uses oil as an expression both of Venezuela and of how Venezuela is perceived internationally. By means of sculpture, graphics, film, and video, and sometimes live performance, he examines the ideas of power, money, and religion through the vehicle of oil and the machinery associated with its extraction.

His initial exhibition on this theme was entitled The Oil Tower, which was mounted in 1980 at the Alternative Museum. He was supported in part during these early years by Fellowships from the Venezuelan National Endowment for the Arts (CONAC) and CAPS in New York, and a grant from the National Art Foundation in Venezuela (FUNDARTE). In 1997 he was chosen to represent Venezuela at the 47th Venice Biennial. His project El Modelo Estándar de la Materia: Tributo al Siglo XX, an interactive multimedia installation, was mounted in 1999 at the Sofía Imber Contemporary Art Museum in Caracas. He presented many video installations with oil as metaphor in the ensuing years, including The Oil Spill, at the 2000 London Biennial; El Modelo Estándar de la Materia, at ExpoHannover in 2000; Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking: God’s Barrel, at Espacio de Arte Contemporáneo El Gallo in Salamanca in 2002, which then travelled to the Instituto Italo Latino-Americano in Rome and the Museo Pinacoteca Amedeo Modigliani in Follonica, Italy, and was revived as a mural for the Andres Bello Catholic University in Caracas in 2008.

Increasingly recognized as an important figure in the art world, several tributes to his work were organized, such as at “Interarte 99” in Valencia, Spain, in 1999; at Feria Internacional de Arte Contemporáneo, at Mercado de Fuencarral in Madrid, organized by the European Association of Young Artists, in 2000; and the lecture series “Arte Ciencia y Tecnología, en la obra de Rolando Peña” presented at the Andrés Bello Catholic University. In addition he served as a Professor of Multimedia at the Ateneo de Caracas in 1972-73; as an invited conferee at a conference on contemporary art at the University of St. Denis in Paris in 1985; as a guest artist at the Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones from 1998 to 2001; as a guest lecturer at Andrés Bello Catholic University from 1999 to 2007; and as the organizer of special events for the Organización Nelson Garrido (ONG) in Caracas since 2001.

His knowledge of contemporary art has led to his curating several international shows: Les Droits de l’Art at Chapelle de la Salpêtrière, Paris (1989); Pierre Restany Le Coer et la Raison, at Morleix, France (1991); V Muestra Internacional de Video, in Seville, Spain (1991); AU DELA, Observatori 2001, at Segundo Festival Internacional de Arte, in Valencia; and Performance Art (Dialogues-Performance) at ONG in 2007.

During his Guggenheim Fellowship term, Mr. Peña will be working on a new interactive multimedia exhibition entitled Make Oil Green, which adds the topic of global warming to his persistent interest in and exploration of the theme of oil.

Jocelyne Guilbault: "Roy Cape's Labor of Love: Theorizing Work Ethics through Musical Biography"

Event Start: 
Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 4:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

The Center for Ethnomusicology is pleased to present:

Prof. Jocelyne Guilbalt (University of California, Berkeley)

Roy Cape's Labor of Love: Theorizing Work Ethics through Musical Biography

Thursday Oct. 23, 2014

4:00  - 6:00 pm
Center for Ethnomusicology
701C Dodge Hall (Columbia Morningside Campus)

Jocelyne Guilbault is Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Music Department of the University of California, Berkeley. Since 1980, she has done extensive fieldwork in the French Creole- and English-speaking islands of the Caribbean on both traditional and popular music. Informed by a postcolonial perspective, she published several articles on issues of representation, aesthetics, the cultural politics of West Indian music industries, multiculturalism, and world music. She is the author of Zouk: World Music in the West Indies (1993), a study that maps the complex musical network among the French-Creole speaking islands, and the vexed relations that are articulated through music between the West Indian French Departments and the Metropole, France. Co-editor of Border Crossings: New Directions in Music Studies (1999-2000), she has since then been on several Editorial boards, including The Black Music Research Journal, the Society for Ethnomusicology Journal, and MUSICultures (Canada). In 2007, she published Governing Sound: the Cultural Politics of Trinidad's Carnival Musics (2007), a study that explores the ways the calypso music scene became audibly entangled with projects of governing, audience demands, and market incentives. Her new book about and with Roy Cape, titled Roy Cape: A Life on the Calypso and Soca Banstand (2014) is both a study about reputation, circulation, and work ethics, and a dialogic experiment in story.

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Event Sponsors: 
 Center for Ethnomusicology



















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Congratulations to Dr. Melissa Gonzalez!


The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Melissa Gonzalezwho successfully defended her PhD dissertation on September 17, 2014.  Dr. Gonzalez is also an alumna of the Barnard College music major.  Her dissertation, advised by Prof. Christopher Washburne,  is entitled: "Cien por Ciento Nacional!" Panamanian Musica Tipica and the Quest for National and Territorial Sovereignty."  

Dissertation Abstract:  "In this dissertation, I investigate the socio-cultural and musical transfigurations of a rural-identified musical genre known as musica tipica as it engages with the dynamics of Panama's rural/urban divide and the country's nascent engagement with the global political economy. Though regarded as emblematic of Panama's national folklore, musica tipica is also the basis for the country's principal and most commercially successful popular music style known by the same name. The primary concern of this project is to examine how and why this particular genre continues to undergo simultaneous processes of folklorization and commercialization. As an unresolved genre of music, I argue that musica tipica can offer rich insight into the politics of working out individual and national Panamanian identities.   

Based on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Panama City and several rural communities in the country's interior, I examine the social struggles that subtend the emergence of musica tipica's genre variations within local, national, and transnational contexts. Through close ethnographic analysis of particular case studies, this work explores how musicians, fans, and the country's political and economic structures constitute divisions in regards to generic labeling and how differing fields of musical circulation and meaning are imagined."

Congratulations to Dr. Gonzalez!

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