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Congratulations to Dr. Melissa Gonzalez!


The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Melissa Gonzalezwho successfully defended her PhD dissertation on September 17, 2014.  Dr. Gonzalez is also an alumna of the Barnard College music major.  Her dissertation, advised by Prof. Christopher Washburne,  is entitled: "Cien por Ciento Nacional!" Panamanian Musica Tipica and the Quest for National and Territorial Sovereignty."  

Dissertation Abstract:  "In this dissertation, I investigate the socio-cultural and musical transfigurations of a rural-identified musical genre known as musica tipica as it engages with the dynamics of Panama's rural/urban divide and the country's nascent engagement with the global political economy. Though regarded as emblematic of Panama's national folklore, musica tipica is also the basis for the country's principal and most commercially successful popular music style known by the same name. The primary concern of this project is to examine how and why this particular genre continues to undergo simultaneous processes of folklorization and commercialization. As an unresolved genre of music, I argue that musica tipica can offer rich insight into the politics of working out individual and national Panamanian identities.   

Based on fourteen months of ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Panama City and several rural communities in the country's interior, I examine the social struggles that subtend the emergence of musica tipica's genre variations within local, national, and transnational contexts. Through close ethnographic analysis of particular case studies, this work explores how musicians, fans, and the country's political and economic structures constitute divisions in regards to generic labeling and how differing fields of musical circulation and meaning are imagined."

Congratulations to Dr. Gonzalez!

Congratulations to Dr. Shannon Garland!

Dr. Shannon Garland

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Shannon Garland, who successfully defended her doctoral dissertation on September 5, 2014.  Dr. Garland's dissertation, advised by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa, is entitled: "Music, Affect, Value, and Labor: Late Capitalism and the (Mis)Productions of Indie Music in Chile and Brazil."


Dissertation Abstract: This dissertation traces the tensions surrounding indie music production in Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brazil. I conducted several years of ethnographic research on locally situated, yet transnationally interpolated, musical production, circulation and listening practices in Santiago and Sao Paulo. I open by detailing the expansion of the indie touring market from the global north into both cities, theorizing the enlistment of affect as a neoliberal technique for producing monetary value. The next chapter considers spaces for musical association as forms of infrastructure that both emerge from and themselves help constitute musical-social networks in Santiago. I follow by showing how the history of Brazilian individuals' engagement with particular sets of indie sounds from the global north bear upon the contemporary formation of infrastructures of social relations, musical aesthetics, and places for musical and social association. Finally, I detail how the tensions between the construction of audience, value, aesthetics and circulation arising from new production structures manifest in the politics of a new type of Brazilian institution called Fora do Eixo. Here, I inspect the logics of aesthetic valuation in building structures for music production within a complex state-private nexus of cultural funding in Brazil. As a whole, this dissertation explores the political struggles emerging as actors seek to establish new structures for participating in live shows and for playing music as both a creative practice and as an economic activity within emerging forms of communication made possible by digital media. Each struggle is simultaneously interpolated by the messy articulation of transnationally-produced notions of aesthetics, authentic modes of engagement with music, and moral-ethical ways of organizing music production, circulation and remuneration as a social practice. The dissertation thus highlights the way new media and economic logics build upon and clash with historical practices of production, evaluation of aesthetics, and regimes for mediating the artistic, the economic, and the social.

Sound and Vision Colloquium Series

click image for full sized poster!
Sound and Vision Poster






























Center for Ethnomusicology 2014 Sound & Vision Series

Conference and Concert: La Voz/Voice (Sept. 26-27, 2014)

Event Start: 
Friday, September 26, 2014 - 9:00am - Saturday, September 27, 2014 - 11:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall/Black Box Theater, Barnard College Diana Center

The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a conference and concert:


La Voz – Voice
In Spanish, Portuguese and English
Co-organized with ILAS, LAIC and Barnard Forum for Migration


PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE ARE NO MORE TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR THE SEPT. 27 CONCERT EVENT.


Sept. 26 and September 27, 2014
Center for Ethnomusicology (701C Dodge Hall)
and
Black Box Theater at Barnard College Diana Center

Participants: Juan Carlos Asensio Palacios, Ticio Escobar, Licia Fiol-Matta, Enrique Ignacio Gavilán Domínguez, Anne Levitsky, Cacá Machado, Laura Jordán, Silvia Martínez, Marti Newland, Ana M. Ochoa,  Deisi Oliveira Montardo, María Pagán-Mattos, Jesús Rodríguez Velasco, Osvaldo Salerno, Aurélie Vialette, Leonardo Waisman.

There will also be a concert related to the conference: Sept. 26, 7.30 pm Blackbox Theater, Barnard, original compositions by Mexican composer Marcela Rodríguez (Rasgando el Silencio) performed by Lucía Pulido and Jeffrey Zeigler, and Brazilian composer and musicologist, Cacá Machado (Ritmo y Silencio, canciones),  Performed by Lucía Pulido and Cacá Machado.

See attached conference program for more information.

La Voz Program


Click image for full sized program poster!









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Indigeneity and Music: talks by Amanda Minks & Deise Lucy Montardo (Sept. 18, 12-2)

Event Start: 
Thursday, September 18, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia University Morningside Campus, 116th St. and Broadway
The Center for Ethnomusicology presents a colloquium on:

Indigeneity and Music

featured speakers:

Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma):
"Constructing Culture and Indigeneity on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua"

Deise Lucy Montardo (Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Brazil; President. Brazilian Ethnomusicology Association [ABET]):
Music and Cosmology in Lowland South America: Guarani and Baniwa cases

Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014
12 noon - 2pm
701C Dodge Hall (The Center for Ethnomusicology)
Columbia University Morningside Campus (B'way and 116th St.)

Free and Open to the Public

___________________

Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at OU.  She earned a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006, with research specializations in music-language relations and language socialization.  Her courses focus on music, language, and cultural politics in the Americas.  She also teaches a course with a global focus on intellectual property and cultural heritage.

Dr. Minks has conducted ethnographic research on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua for over ten years.  She has examined the aesthetics and politics of play among Miskitu children living on Corn Island in her monograph Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua (University of Arizona Press, 2013).  She has also written about Miskitu music and community media in Bilwi, in the northern autonomous region of the Atlantic coast.  Most recently, she has been studying inter-American cultural policies of the mid-20th century and their impact on discourses of development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

Dr. Minks has received grants and fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the Fulbright Institute of International Education, among others.  Her past publications include articles in the journals Pragmatics, Language and Communication, Ethnomusicology, Yearbook for Traditional Music, and Wani, as well as chapters in several edited volumes.

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George Yúdice: Vulgar musics and the challenge to the recognition of cultural heritage (Sept 8)

Event Start: 
Monday, September 8, 2014 - 4:10pm
The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

George Yúdice (Director, Miami Observatory on Communication and Creative Industries, University of Miami)

Vulgar musics and the challenge to the recognition of cultural heritage

Monday, Sept. 8,  2014
4.10 – 6.30pm
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology)

http://works.bepress.com/george_yudice/

George Yúdice received his B.A. (Chemistry) from Hunter College, CUNY; his M.A.
(Spanish) from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana; and his Ph.D. (Romance
Languages) from Princeton University (1977). His teaching includes critical theory,
literary and cultural studies; his courses range from contemporary aesthetics and
politics to urban imaginaries, to film recreations of literary works, Mapping Miami, and
cultural policy in Latin America. He also teaches in the Program in Latin American
Studies and he is director of the Miami Observatory on Communication and Creative
Industries (www.miamiobservatory.org), which tracks work in music, theater, audiovisual, culture-based urban revitalization, cultural networks throughout the Americas, and community-based projects in South Florida


Congratulations to Dr. Marti Newland!

Dr. Martha Newland

The Center warmly congratulates Dr. Marti Newland, who successfull defended her dissertation, entitled Sounding “Black”: An Ethnography of Racialized Vocality at Fisk University, on June 23, 2014.  Her dissertation was sponsoredby Prof. Fox.

Dr. Newland has accepted a postdoctoral position as Core Lecturer (Music Humanities) at Columbia University for 2014-16.  

Congrats Marti!




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Dr. Jessica Schwartz Appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at UCLA!

Dr. Jessica Schwartz

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates Dr. Jessica Schwartz, currently completing her two year term as a Mellon Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in the Department, who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Musicology at The University of California, Los Angeles!

Dr. Schwartz holds the PhD in Ethnomusicology from New York University, where she completed a dissertation entitled:  "Resonances of the Atomic Age: Hearing the Nuclear Legacy in the United States and the Marshall Islands, 1945-2010," advised by Prof. Jairo Moreno.  She has published articles in, among other places,  Transactions of the Royal Historical Society,Women and Music, and Music&Politics.  Dr. Schwartz is also the founder of  the Marshallese Educational Initiative, Inc., a not-for-profit organization dedicated to expanding educational opportunities for Marshallese and raising awareness of Marshallese issues.

Lauren Flood Wins Whiting Dissertation Fellowship!

Lauren E. Flood

Lauren Flood (Ethnomusicology) has been awarded a dissertation completion fellowship for 2014-15 from the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation. The title of her dissertation is "Building and Becoming: DIY Music Technology in New York and Berlin," and it is sponsored by Prof. Ana Maria Ochoa.








Dr. Toby King Appointed Assistant Professor of Music at UNC/Asheville!

Jonathan "Toby" King

The Center for Ethnomusicology warmly congratulates
Dr. Jonathan "Toby" King (PhD, Ethnomusicology, 2014), who has been appointed Assistant Professor of Music at The University of North Carolina at Asheville!  Dr. King's dissertation is entitled "Implications of Contemporary Bluegrass Music Performance at and around a New York City Jam Session," and it is sponsored by Prof. Aaron Fox. Dr. King defended his dissertation on June 2, 2014.  We congratulate him for that as well!

Dale Cockrell: Blood on Fire: Sex and Music in America, 1840-1917 (May 2, 3pm)

Event Start: 
Friday, May 2, 2014 - 3:00pm
Location: 
622 Dodge Hall (CU Morningside Campus)

The Department of Music and the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University Present: 

Blood on Fire:  Sex and Music in America, 1840-1917

A talk by:
Prof. Dale Cockrell (Director, Center for Popular Music, Middle Tennessee State University; Professor of Musicology Emeritus, Vanderbilt University; Research Associate, University of the Free State, South Africa)

Friday, May 2, 2014
3:00PM
622 Dodge Hall (CU Morningside Campus)
Free and Open to the Public



Abstract: Prostitution in the United States between 1840-1917 was big business. Walt Whitman’s “plain truth” assertion was only a mild exaggeration when he claimed that “nineteen out of twenty of the mass of American young men, who live in or visit the great cities, are more or less familiar with houses of prostitution and are customers to them.”  Tens of thousands of brothels, concert saloons, and dance halls across the nation—all common sites for prostitution—featured regular, full-time professional music-making for dancing, and thus provided a well-paid livelihood for working musicians.  Indeed, a statistical analysis suggests that a third to half of all professional performing musicians during the period were directly employed full-time in the service of prostitution.  Evidence of that music-making indicates that an energetic “noisy” dance music was developed specifically to stimulate eroticized male bodies, and hence to stimulate profits for the houses.  This project thus explores the nexus between prostitution, music-making, dance, sexuality, blackface minstrelsy, the underground cultural economy, and the development of musical foundations upon which an extraordinarily vital twentieth-century American popular music was built.

About the speaker: Dale Cockrell is the Director of the Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University, Professor of Musicology Emeritus at Vanderbilt University, and a Research Associate of the University of the Free State (South Africa).  He is widely published in the field of American music studies, including The Ingalls Wilder Family Songbook (2011), Vol. 22 in the Music of the United States of America series; Demons of Disorder:  Early Blackface Minstrels and Their World (1997), which won the C. Hugh Holman Award; Excelsior:  Journals of the Hutchinson Family Singers, 1842-1846 (1989), recipient of the Irving Lowens Award; ten other books and editions; and more than seventy scholarly articles.  He is a former President of the Society for American Music, from which he received the Distinguished Service Award in 2010, an elected Member of the American Antiquarian Society, and the Founder and President of  The Pa’s Fiddle Project, an educational, scholarly, and musical program dedicated to recording the music of the Little House books and reconnecting the nation’s children with the rich music legacies embedded in them.

Prof. Matthew Sakakeeny: Instrumentality: Technologies of Voice in the New Orleans Brass Band (4/10, 12-2PM)

Event Start: 
Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia U Morningside Campus (Broadway & 116th St.)

The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University Presents:

Instrumentality: Technologies of Voice in the New Orleans Brass Band

Matthew Sakakeeny
(Associate Professor of Music, Tulane University, and alumnus, Columbia PhD program in Ethnomusicology)

(click image to enlarge)

Thursday April 10, 2014
12:00-2:00 pm

Center for Ethnomusicology, 701C Dodge Hall
Columbia University Morningside Campus (Broadway at 116th St.)

__________________________________________________

Speaker Bio:

Matthew Sakakeeny is Associate Professor of Music at Tulane University. An ethnomusicologist, journalist, and musician, Matt is the author of the book Roll With It: Brass Bands in the Streets of New Orleans (Duke University Press, 2013) and articles in EthnomusicologyBlack Music Research Journal, and other publications. He graduated from the Columbia University ethnomusicology PhD program in 2008. 

Abstract:
The instrumentality of musical instruments is to act as a voice unmoored from language. Linguistic anthropologists have argued that speech acts produce subjectivity through vocal sound, and instruments extend this sonic materiality into domains where semantic meaning is augmented or even replaced by musical voicings. In New Orleans, the instruments of the brass band are sound technologies utilized to communicate particular messages to a community of listeners. In the local tradition of the jazz funeral, musicians determine the emotional register of the procession: mournful hymns regulate the slow march to the gravesite and upbeat popular songs signal the transition to celebratory dancing after burial. The musicians not only organize the memorial by changing tempo and repertoire, they communicate to the living and the dead through the material sound of their instruments. Black New Orleanians occupying public spaces where lynchings, race riots, segregation, and gentrification have taken place "give voice" to these submerged histories by marching and dancing to the beat of the brass band. And the most recent generation of musicians has drawn upon hip-hop, integrating the direct language of rap into a polyphony of voices that includes horns, drums, and group singing. In this case study of the brass bands of New Orleans, a holistic approach to sonic materiality integrates the spoken, the sung, and instrumental sound in a densely layered soundscape that creates meaning and value for radicalized subjects of power.

Book Release Event for Prof. Lila Ellen Gray's "Fado Resounding" at Book Culture (4/9, 7pm)

Event Start: 
Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 7:00pm
Prof. Lila Ellen Gray presents her new book, Fado Resounding: Affective Politics and Urban Life (Duke Univ. Press) at Book Culture

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014
7:00pm
Free and Open to the Public
@ Book Culture
536 W 112th St., NYC (Btwn. Broadway and Amsterdam Aves.)
(212) 865-1588
http://www.bookculture.com

Prof. Ellen Gray at "Raising the Bar": "Listening in Lisbon's Fado Bars" (4/29, 8:30pm)

Event Start: 
Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 8:30pm
Location: 
The Duplex 61 Christopher Street Manhattan, NY

Prof. Lila Ellen Gray on "Listening in Lisbon's Fado Bars" 

Part of the "Raising the Bar" event (details here):

http://rtbevent.com/talks/lila-ellen-gray.html

(tickets must be reserved online)

April 29, 2014 
8:30 pm 
The Duplex
61 Christopher Street
Manhattan, NY 10014, USA

Read the feature story on "Raising the Bar" events in The Guardian.

_______________________________________

Prof. Gray will also be present for a special book release event for Fado Resounding at Book Culture, April 9th at 7PM.

Cacá Machado: "Music, History and Literature in the Work of Ernesto Nazareth" (3/24, 5:30PM)

Event Start: 
Monday, March 24, 2014 - 5:30pm
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall (Center for Ethnomusicology, Columbia Morningside Campus, 116th and Broadway)

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Music, history and literature in the work of Ernesto Nazareth

a talk by

Prof. Cacá Machado (University of São Paulo, Brazil)

Date: Monday, March 24, 2014
Time: 5.30 pm - 7.30 pm
Place: Center for Ethnomusicology,  Dodge Hall 701C, 
Columbia University Morningside Campus (Broadway and 116th St.)
Sponsored by: Center for Ethnomusicology
Center for Ethnomusicology events are always free and open to the public!

Speaker Biography:
Cacá Machado is a musician and historian from the University of São Paulo, where he is also a visiting professor. He is author of O enigma do homem célebre: ambição e vocação de Ernesto Nazareth (Instituto Moreira Salles, 2007),  (The enigma of the famous man: ambition and vocation of Ernesto Nazareth), Tom Jobim (publifolha, 2008) and Todo Nazareth: obras completas (6 volumes, Água-forte, 2011) (All Nazareth, Complete Works). Recently he also released his latest CD eslavosamba (YB Music/Circus, 2013) with the participation of several noted musicians from Brazil.

Prof. Samuel Araújo: Reengaging Research Praxis in the Real World (3/28, 11AM)

Event Start: 
Friday, March 28, 2014 - 11:00am
Location: 
701C Dodge Hall, The Center for Ethnomusicology (Columbia Morningside Campus, 116th & Broadway)

Click to enlarge

The Center for Ethnomusicology Presents:

Reengaging Research Praxis in the Real World: Politico-Epistemological Dimensions of Intercultural Dialogue in the Ethnography of Music-Making

Prof. Samuel Araújo 
(Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Tinker VIsiting Professsor at The University of Chicago, Spring 2014)

Friday, March 28
11.00 am - 1.00 pm
Center for Ethnomusicology, Dodge Hall 701C

Center for Ethnomusicology events are always FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

ABSTRACT:  Among other key issues in many post-industrial metropolitan areas today are the tight perspectives for inclusion of increasing numbers of their youth population in the formal job market, tending to render lasting if not permanent a situation previously had as transitory, i.e. to remain in what Marx termed the reserve labor army. Not sharing the values of older generations forged under the supremacy of industrial work ethics, these new contingents of urban subjects frequently lack identification with, and not rarely rage against older ideals of edifying musical heritages and identity markers, leading to the adoption of internationalized forms (e.g., funk, rap, graffiti), defying established artistic and cultural canons, which expose the signs of degradation of social life, as well as policies of isolation and extermination of the poor. Based on both his academic experience with participatory action-research on the favela soundscapes of Rio de Janeiro and as a public sector cultural administrator, the author will explore these challenges, highlighting a number of new demands this social equation poses to both academics and policy makers.    

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SPEAKER BIO: Prof. Samuel Araújo coordinates the Ethnomusicology Laboratory at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and is a Tinker Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago for the Spring of 2014. He has published several articles and book chapters, besides editing three collective volumes, in Brazil and abroad on music, politics, cultural policy and violence, as well as on action-research projects in collaboration with organizations based in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas.  


 read more »

Prof. Ellen Gray Publishes "Fado Resounding"



The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Professor Ellen Gray on the publication of her book Fado Resounding: Affective Politics and Urban Life (Duke University Press). This ethnography of fado, Portugal's most celebrated popular music genre, shows how a musical genre can sediment, circulate, and transform affect, sonorously rendering history and place as soulful and feeling as public.

The book's introduction is currently available for preview and free download on Scribd.

 "Lila Ellen Gray positions Lisbon's amateur fado scene in terms of all the contestation about what fado is and where the action is taking place. This positioning is a unique and valuable contribution to music ethnography, and Gray does major and convincing intellectual work arguing for 'amateur' scenes as paths into the deepest musical and ethnographic understandings of genre, style, performance, poesis, and the ways that sociality is lived and experienced through sound."—Steven Feld, author of Jazz Cosmopolitanism in Accra: Five Musical Years in Ghana

Readers in the USA can receive a 20% discount on the book when ordering directly from Duke University Press (use code P13GRAY at checkout). 
http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding

In Europe, the book is available through Combined Academic Publishers with a 30% discount (use the code CS1113FADO).
www.combinedacademic.co.uk

In Lisbon, the book is available at the bookstore Fabula Urbis:
http://www.fabula-urbis.pt/

http://www.dukeupress.edu/Fado-Resounding/

https://www.facebook.com/FadoResounding



 read more »

Ethnomusicology PhD Candidate Adam Kielman Wins Three Major Prizes!














The Center for Ethnomusicology congratulates Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD candidate Adam Kielman, who has won three prestigious prizes for papers presented at academic conferences, in addition to a major research fellowship (Fulbright DDRA) for his work in China.

The prizes awarded to Mr. Kielman include:

The Hewitt Pantaleoni Prize  -- Awarded by the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of Ethnomusicology (MACSEM) for the best student paper presented at their annual meeting held March 23-24, 2013 in Richmond, VA. Paper title: " 'Sounds like Home': Language and Place in Guangzhou's Modern Folk."

The Martin Hatch Award  -- Awarded by the Society for Asian Music (SAM) for the best student paper on Asian music presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."

The Barbara Barnard Smith Prize -- Awarded by the Association for Chinese Music Research (ACMR) to recognize an outstanding student paper in the field of Chinese music, broadly defined, presented at the annual Society for Ethnomusicology national meeting held November 1-4, 2012 in New Orleans, LA. Paper title: "Xiandai Minyao: 'Modern Folk' in Guangzhou."
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Mr. Kielman, who is also an alumnus of Columbia College (EALAC major, LAJPP performer), has also just successfully defended his doctoral dissertation proposal, entitled "Sounding Configurations of Difference in Postsocialist China."  He is preparing to depart for field research in China with support from a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship, awarded in September 2013.
Congratulations to Mr. Kielman!


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CU Alum Amanda Minks Publishes "Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua"


The Center congratulates PhD program alumna Prof. Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma, PhD in Ethnomusicology, 2006), who has just published Voices of Play: Miskitu Children's Speech and Song on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua with the University of Arizona Press' First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies series (2013).

While indigenous languages have become prominent in global political and educational discourses, limited attention has been given to indigenous children's everyday communication. Voices of Play  is a study of multilingual play and performance among Miskitu children growing up on Corn Island, part of a multi-ethnic autonomous region on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua.

Corn Island is historically home to Afro-Caribbean Creole people, but increasing numbers of Miskitu people began moving there from the mainland during the Contra War, and many Spanish-speaking mestizos from western Nicaragua have also settled there. Miskitu kids on Corn Island often gain some competence speaking Miskitu, Spanish, and Kriol English. As the children of migrants and the first generation of their families to grow up with television, they develop creative forms of expression that combine languages and genres, shaping intercultural senses of belonging.

Voices of Play is the first ethnography to focus on the interaction between music and language in children's discourse. Minks skillfully weaves together Latin American, North American, and European theories of culture and communication, creating a transdisciplinary dialogue that moves across intellectual geographies. Her analysis shows how music and language involve a wide range of communicative resources that create new forms of belonging and enable dialogue across differences. Miskitu children's voices reveal the intertwining of speech and song, the emergence of "self" and "other," and the centrality of aesthetics to social struggle.

Amanda Minks is Associate Professor in the Honors College and is affiliated with the Department of Anthropology and with the programs in Native American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at Oklahoma University. She earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology at Columbia University in 2006.

 read more »

David Novak Publishes "Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation"


The Center congratulates Columbia Ethnomusicology PhD program alumnus David Novak.  Prof. Novak (UCSB) has just published Japanoise: Music at the Edge of Circulation (Duke University Press, 2013).


Visit the Japanoise website

Noise, an underground music made through an amalgam of feedback, distortion, and electronic effects, first emerged as a genre in the 1980s, circulating on cassette tapes traded between fans in Japan, Europe, and North America. With its cultivated obscurity, ear-shattering sound, and over-the-top performances, Noise has captured the imagination of a small but passionate transnational audience.

For its scattered listeners, Noise always seems to be new and to come from somewhere else: in North America, it was called "Japanoise." But does Noise really belong to Japan? Is it even music at all? And why has Noise become such a compelling metaphor for the complexities of globalization and participatory media at the turn of the millennium?

In Japanoise, David Novak draws on more than a decade of research in Japan and the United States to trace the "cultural feedback" that generates and sustains Noise. He provides a rich ethnographic account of live performances, the circulation of recordings, and the lives and creative practices of musicians and listeners. He explores the technologies of Noise and the productive distortions of its networks. Capturing the textures of feedback—its sonic and cultural layers and vibrations—Novak describes musical circulation through sound and listening, recording and performance, international exchange, and the social interpretations of media. read more »

David Novak is Associate Professor of Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and earned the PhD in Ethnomusicology in 2006, after which he served as a postdoctoral fellow in Columbia's Society of Fellows.
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